F I G U R A T I V E L Y
S E E I N G
GROUP EXHIBITION
@Knowhere Art Gallery
July 2, 2021 - August 1, 2021

  • Andrea Grillo
  • Brian Booth Craig
  • Marryam Moma
  • Sachi Rome
  • Daryl Alexander
  • Rafaela Santos

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Figuratively Seeing explores identity and remembrance through representational and figurative work.

Through painting, sculpture and mixed media, these seven artists show incredible diversity of perception. The artwork ranges from realistic, abstract, tangible, surreal and ethereal. Through a portrayal of imagined, living and ancestral people, the artists honor individuals and the communities they represent.

The use of layers in mixed media and collage lends itself to an exploration of intersectionality. Marryam Moma, a Tanzanian-Nigerian female artist, deconstructs imagery, cleanly executing complex and composed collages.Sachi Rome, an African-American female artist, is guided by intuitive brushstrokes and color to create figures that are familiar and spectral.

Similarly, Andrea Grillo’s planned mark-making blended with frenzied brushstrokes play the emotional and logical sides of the human experience, portraying figures both known and imagined.

We are beings that are connected to our past and our present. Rafaella Santos, an Afro-Latina female artist, composes shadowy silhouettes with splashes of color, portraying familial loss and diasporic belonging. Daryl Alexander’s saturated and vibrant watercolor portraits are based on those that once were, figures in history, our unnamed ancestors.

By resurrecting the images of the unknown, we make them present once again. We invite and unite with them in our realm of being.

By depicting a person that is present and living in a realistic dimension, we immortalize their body and their spirit. In Brian Booth Craig’s neoclassical bronze sculptures, the mastery of his skill renders taut muscles in smooth skin, fingers delicately poised and expression fixed firmly on the viewer. The figures are imbued with agency, proud and strong in their gaze, just like in Daryl Alexander’s historical portrait series.